JanuaryLight: raincoat

Why am I posting a picture of a raincoat? Because it reminds me of this couplet from the song Big shot, by the Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band, which has always tickled me:

A punk stopped me on the street. He said, “You got a light, Mac?”
I said, “No, but I’ve got a dark brown overcoat.”

I don’t have a dark brown overcoat, but I do have a light mac! On this penultimate day of the January Squares words ending in light challenge I hope you will also delight in the joke. Or maybe you won’t. Forgive me, Becky, for mucking about with your theme.

January Light: churches

Two churches in Glasgow’s West End, both with spectacular floodlight. Above, Wellington Church (Thomas Lennox Watson, 1883-4) with its splendid Corinthian columns. Below, Kelvinside Hillhead Parish Church (James Sellar, 1876) modelled on the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris.

Linked to Becky’s January Squares challenge – words ending in light.

 

January Light: lamp stall

Lamplight on a stall at Edinburgh’s Christmas Market a few years ago. Below, a café in Tarbert with very similar lamps – another two squares which were taken for a previous challenge (Timesquare) and not used. Waste not, want not!

Part of Becky’s January Squares challenge – words ending in light.

January Light: The Lighthouse

No, not a lighthouse, The Lighthouse – Scotland’s Centre for Design and Architecture. Formerly housing The Glasgow Herald, The Lighthouse was the first public commission completed by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. I’ve included it because I love the lamplight on its atrium and the bluelight on its escalators.

Linked to Becky’s January Squares Challenge – words ending in light.

January Light: light canopy

Lots of different kinds of light here in Royal Exchange Square. On the left is the back of the Gallery of Modern Art, the cupola of which I showed you yesterday, and on the right is an Italian restaurant. Both buildings have floodlight. There are Christmas-lights in the buildings facing us, reflected-light on the rainy pavements (this is Glasgow, after all) and fairy-lights in the light canopy above. The canopy is there all year round, it’s not just for Christmas. Ashton Lane near my home also has one, and here you can see what it looks like in daylight.

Linked to Becky’s January Squares Challenge – words ending in light.

January Light: cupolas

The cupola above adorns Holmwood House in Glasgow’s South Side. Now in the care of the National Trust for Scotland, Holmwood is a unique villa designed by Glasgow’s second most famous architect, Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson, and built in 1857-8 for James Couper, a local businessman. Its skylight is perfect for Becky’s January Squares Challenge – words ending in light.

I originally intended to use the cupola from Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art, this part of which was built in 1778 as the townhouse of William Cunninghame, a wealthy Glasgow Tobacco Lord who made his fortune through the triangular slave trade. However, I showed it to Becky on her recent visit and she got in first by including it in the challenge herself! But what the heck – here it is as a bonus skylight.

January Light: Kelvin bridges

Today’s theme is lamplight, specifically on bridges over Glasgow’s River Kelvin. Above is one of the lamps from Kirklee Bridge. Below are two views of Kelvinbridge, in daylight and at twilight.

Finally, the most ornate bridge is probably the one on the Kelvin Way near Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery. Some additional streetlight on show here too.

Linked to Becky’s January Squares challenge – words ending in light.

PS Apologies to anyone disappointed because they thought my title was Kevin Bridges 😉.

January Light: Stirling Castle

A duo of square skies seen from Stirling Castle – late afternoon and early evening sunlight. Inside the castle, there was plenty of candlelight and firelight – both artificial, but still square.

Linked to Becky’s January Squares Challenge – words ending in light.

 

January Light: City Halls

In Glasgow, the City Halls contain a number of concert venues rather than the seat of municipal government – that’s the City Chambers. The grand hall, above, opened in 1841 and was extensively renovated about 15 years ago. The beautiful chandeliers supply roof-light, there’s some spotlight, and also a bit of projected-light on the back wall showing the orchestra’s name. On this occasion, we were awaiting the delight of a performance of Mozart’s Requiem. Linked to Becky’s January Squares challenge – words ending in light.