Glasgow Gallivanting: August 2018

The Hebrides: Image credit: Kelisi via Wikimedia

We have gallivanted away this month, island hopping. We toured the Outer Hebrides, also known as the Western Isles, which are shown in orange on the map above. Starting with a ferry from Ullapool to the northernmost island, Lewis, we worked our way down to Castlebay on Barra from where, three weeks later, we got a ferry back to the mainland at Oban. Look out for a series of posts on our Hebridean Hop coming soon! We last visited these islands between 1989 and 1993, so there might be some “then and now” comparisons too.

Lochleven Castle

The weekend after we got home, we took a trip to Loch Leven to visit the castle. It’s a 14th century tower house in the middle of the loch which has been visited by both Robert the Bruce and Mary Queen of Scots. Mary had previously been welcomed as a guest, but in 1567-8 she was a prisoner and it was here that she was forced to abdicate in favour of her infant son. In May 1568 she escaped, dressed as a servant, and made her way to England. She never saw Scotland again.

Boats leave from the pier at Kinross – ours was booked for 2pm, good planning on my part to allow time for a delicious lunch beforehand at the picturesque Muirs Inn.

The last bit

I met another blogger! I’ve followed Jenny at Random Scottish History for a while now, but didn’t know till last week that she lived within a stone’s throw of Glasgow Women’s Library where I volunteer. Within a day or two we had met up there, I showed her round and we spent a good hour gabbing about history and politics. I’m pleased to say she arrived a non-member and left with a library card so I must have done something right. Come back soon, Jenny! Anyone interested in Scottish history should head over to her blog right now.

In my Amsterdam posts, I mentioned a couple of times the blue and white miniature houses, containing genever or Dutch gin, given away by KLM. We have a good collection and a few people expressed interest (especially the fact that most of them still contain gin) so I said I’d post them. Here they are! All 56, and only two duplicate pairs. The ones without a wax seal are empty – if you get the house on the way out, you have to drink the gin before you can bring it back if you are travelling hand-luggage. This is very disappointing for airline security staff who might be hoping to confiscate it …

My Scottish word of the month is something I found out on my Hebridean trip on which we had a smashing time. I had no idea smashing, in this sense, comes from a Gaelic phrase is math sin which means that’s good. You live and learn!

I hope you all had a great August, and happy September when it comes.

2016 – the ones that nearly got away

30 years at the University of Glasgow
30 years at the University of Glasgow

A Happy New Year, everyone! I hope 2017 will be good to us all. I’m trying to polish off 2016 by clearing out old photos and ideas for blog posts. Some will get an entry to themselves; this is a catch-up for the rest – the ones that nearly got away.

John

You’ll all be familiar with John, my partner in life and photographer-in-chief. He had a big birthday this year – can you guess which one from the pictures below? Not hard! He also had a presentation to mark 30 years of service at the University of Glasgow (top image), which means we’ve lived 30 years in Glasgow as we moved up from Yorkshire when he got his lectureship. That’s over half my life – in the first half I lived in 9 different towns or cities, so I think I can now call myself settled.

Mum

The other big family milestone last year was my Mum’s 90th birthday which I’ve already written about (here). Earlier in the year, she and I paid a visit to the village she grew up in, Kilmacolm. We’ve been before, many times, but this time we took some photographs where her home used to stand. The name of the building was Low Shells – now, there is only a grassy area and some benches but the name lives on.

Dams to Darnley

Dams to Darnley is a newish country park which sits between Barrhead, Darnley and Newton Mearns to the south of Glasgow. We found it almost by accident when we were looking for somewhere else and enjoyed a pleasant Sunday afternoon stroll there. Centred on a series of reservoirs and bisected by a railway, it’s not particularly spectacular but I’ve included it because I’m impressed that two councils (it falls between Glasgow City and East Renfrewshire) have co-operated to make the most of limited green space and not build all over it.

Palacerigg

Palacerigg is another minor country park within half an hour of Glasgow. Again, the local council, North Lanarkshire this time, has made a big effort to introduce nature trails, birds and animals, particularly with children in mind. This was July, but I see I am wearing winter clothes. The joys of a Scottish summer!

Loch Leven

In December we had a couple of nights in Perth. I’ve started some posts about that, but I don’t think I’ll get round to writing about the lovely walk at Loch Leven we did on the way home. Here’s a slide-show of some of the best images. It was a stunningly crisp morning as you can see.

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2016 Stats

Finally, speaking of the ones that got away, whatever has happened to WordPress’s stats helper monkeys? You know, the ones that send you a report with fireworks that tells you how your blog did that year? Or is it just me they’ve decided not to visit? *Sulks*. Anyway, being a resourceful type, I’ve looked at the 2016 stats all by myself. They’re up by over 50% compared to 2015, which is lovely, and of the ten most read posts nine were about Scotland (one of my Yellowstone posts just scraped in at number ten). I guess you like reading about my home country! There will be much more of the same this year so I hope you will keep visiting. I’m grateful to everyone who has read, liked, commented or all three. As a TV series of my youth used to end “Thank you for coming to my little show. I love you all!” (Brownie points if you can identify which one….)