#RoofSquares 23-30: Glasgow edition

The final countdown …

For my last selection of roofs for Becky’s #RoofSquares Challenge I’m sticking to Glasgow, starting with St Mungo’s Cathedral (1136) seen here from part way up the hill of the Necropolis.

Another imposing building is the neo-Gothic University of Glasgow, but I’ve not chosen an external view this time. Above are the Cloisters, also known as the Undercroft. It’s graduation season at the moment and they are a-flutter with colourful gowns, but this shot was taken around Christmas.

Just look at the carvings beneath the roof of this building at 1 La Belle Place, Kelvingrove! Currently a Hindu Mandir, it was built as the Queen’s Rooms in the 1850s to be used to celebrate the arts and sciences. Of particular interest to me: it was the location of a Suffrage Celebration meeting (tickets sixpence) on Saturday 20th April 1918 after the planting of the Suffrage Oak on nearby Kelvin Way. I only learned this recently and it has made me look at the building with new affection.

I could call this next section “Turret Envy”! Moving on from public buildings, these are all private houses within a few minutes walk from my own home (which looks nothing like any of these).

The houses at each end of this terrace on Kirklee Road have a splendid round turret. The one shown, until recent years, was supported by concrete buttresses which made it very ugly, but it has now been strengthened and restored. I can imagine sitting in that bay window with a good book and a glass of red – though I’d love that even more in this next one.

This is Kensington Tower (1858). Wow, just wow! I would love to have that tower room.

If you think the roofline of Lancaster Crescent looks like a terrace has been bolted on to a standalone villa, you are correct. Redlands House was built in 1870-71 and originally stood in grounds of 24 acres. For much of the 20th century it was a women’s hospital before being converted back into residential accommodation. The terrace was added in stages between 1898 and 1907, which you can probably tell by the different windows at roof level.

The last house might be surprising!

Ayton House (c. 1859) was badly damaged in the Blitz in 1941, and by the 1980s was threatened with demolition. However, it was rescued by a developer who added a modernist penthouse flat. What do you think? It certainly divides opinion locally – but it’s another place I could imagine myself sitting, glass in hand, at sunset.

I walk past Ayton House often, but I had never looked round the back until someone dropped me a hint. This is what I found.

It’s an extension bearing the unmistakable hallmarks of Charles Rennie Mackintosh who designed it. Which brings me back to the sad subject of the Art School – the latest news is that it is likely to be partially demolished because some of the walls are in danger of collapsing.

On to happier things: as well as linking to Becky’s challenge, I’m also linking to Cathy’s Photography Intention invitation on ~wander.essence~.  All my roof-themed posts would fit, but I’ve chosen this one because I had a conversation with Cathy in the comments on one of her other posts about Victorian houses, and the differences between here and North America. (Turrets are a common feature, but ours are solidly sandstone as opposed to colourful wood).

Because of the way I’ve grouped my roofs on a Friday, I’m finishing a day early – but I just couldn’t stop myself. I suspect roofs will now be as addictive as benches are after Jude’s challenge a couple of years ago, so here are a few more I’ve gathered, again all close to home.
Many thanks to Becky for running such a great challenge. I’ve enjoyed participating.

72 thoughts on “#RoofSquares 23-30: Glasgow edition

  1. BeckyB July 21, 2018 / 13:06

    That house certainly was surprising. Wonderful selection as always. I am so glad you were able to join us every week.

    And apologies once more it has taken me so long to pop by and see all of your fab roofs.

    Like

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